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Bhooshan

Bhooshan Pandya is a UX consultant & Product Designer with more than 12 years of experience in representing global brands within cross-cultural teams in many countries. He brings his customer-centric vision to projects and is an ardent advocate of ‘design-thinking’ for co-creating solutions that create value for both the business and users. While working with a product he follows the objective of designing an experience which is enjoyable, engaging, and enduring.

Stuff I Didn’t Know About This Image of India

I am passionate about anything that is even remotely related to space, and this one has stuck with me since schooldays. So, as a kid from India in the 80s’, I would ponder endlessly over this satellite imagery on the back of my geography textbook probably the 6th or 7th grade, that showed the Indian peninsula alongside the island nation of Sri Lanka. All along I was curious to know the origins of this photo, like, who captured it? What was that strange pole? etc., and I was thrilled to have stumbled upon a NASA website carrying this information.

India - Gemini 11 Photo

Picture of peninsular south India was taken from space in the 60s!

So this image was taken by the Gemini 11 crew (Conrad-Gordon) on September 14, 1966 “using a 70 mm lens on a modified Hasselblad film camera”, and I don’t know why but it somehow made it to the geography school textbooks in India and into my inquisitive mind. And as I discovered later, that “strange pole” in the picture is the “7-FT Retractable L-Band Boom Antenna” from the Agena Target Vehicle.

Source: India by Night and Day : Image of the Day

Giving up on ‘InFamous: Second Son’!

Being a gamer and someone who takes his challenges much seriously, it’s particularly harder for me to accept that I am giving up on ‘InFamous: Second Son‘. This is a great game, the greatest exclusive perhaps on the PS4 made by Sucker Punch, and I am sad not only because I wasn’t able to beat the ‘He Who Dwells’ boss fight, but I would be left deprived of the most amazing game experiences just for not beating this boss fight. It hurts. But I tried my best – I watched videos and read tips online, and concluded that I am not ready yet to jump platforms over lava AND engage with multiple targets at the same time. The last time I faced such a difficult challenge in a boss fight was with Kessler in ‘InFamous’ on PS3 and I quit after like spending months trying to beat him. Thankfully, that fight was the last boss fight of the game and I had played the game mostly. Maybe I will return to Second Son in the distant future, but for now, I am giving it complete rest because I need some rest too.

Quotes from ‘Steve Jobs – The Lost Interview’

Steve Jobs - The Lost InterviewThis is one of my favourite documentaries on Steve Jobs, an interview with the legend who’s at his best reliving his time at Apple, NeXT, and beyond. It’s full of anecdotes from his thought process on product design, and why Microsoft is after all…Microsoft and I thought to reproduce some of his insightful quotes. This interview was conducted by Bob Cringely in 1995, it was lost until the director of the series found a VHS copy in his garage, and released to theatres in 2012.

At a time when technology has virtually seeped into our psyche, this interview brings a tremendous insight as to how far we have come, and especially for Apple as a company as it continues to innovate.

On Becoming a Millionaire at a Young Age

“I was worth about over a million dollars when I was 23 and over $10 million when I was 24 and over $100 million when I was 25. And it wasn’t that important because I never did it for the money. I think money is a wonderful thing ’cause it enables you to do things. It enables you to invest in ideas that don’t have a short-term payback and things like that. But especially at that point in my life, it was not the most important thing. The most important thing was the company, the people, the products we were making, what we were gonna enable people to do with these products.”

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Why You Should Be Embracing ‘Inclusive Design’

Today is the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, promoted by the United Nations since 1992 as an understanding of disability issues and to mobilize support for the dignity, rights, and well-being of persons with disabilities. I find this an excellent opportunity to reflect on the choices we make as designers of the modern digital revolution in embracing inclusive design for our products.

Product companies are increasingly aiming for an equitable relationship with its diversified customer segments. Designers in the ‘customer experience’ and ‘user experience’ field whose primary focus was streamlining user-interactions would have to accommodate a strategic-level thought process in incorporating a 360-degree outlook which includes a product’s physical & environmental aspects besides UI. For design professionals, therefore, the boundary between ‘industrial design’ and ‘experience design’ has blurred exponentially as customers evolve and companies remain committed to delivering business value.

As a consultant, I am involved in the framing of a viable design strategy for digital systems and applications, and it becomes imperative that I acknowledge the ambiguity of connecting the product goals with user needs and make amends in advocating a design which is inclusive for all. In more specific terms, that means integrating a systems design that reaches out to the masses by helping them achieve their objectives regardless of the physical and mental hurdles. In the words of the legendary Steve Jobs lies vital clues for designers in approaching products from the context of an ‘inclusive design’ which is engaging.

“Most people make the mistake of thinking design is what it looks like. People think it’s this veneer – that the designers are handed this box and told, ‘Make it look good!’ That’s not what we think design is. It’s not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.”

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Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.

Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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Bhooshan Pandya